Sosua Dominican Republic Overview

Sosua is a small beach town on the North Coast of the DR. It’s located in the middle of Puerta Plata and Cabarete. During the 90’s and early 2000’s, Sosua has gained a reputation for being sex tourism hot spot. However in the past several years, the government has tried to make the town more family friendly and has shut down several bars and massage parlors. I will say that despite the government’s efforts, prostitution is still a large part of the local economy. If that’s what you’re looking for then you won’t be disappointed with Sosua. Do note that this website does not cater to whoremongers so we will look at the other aspects of Sosua, and whether it’s worth visiting for the regular traveler.

When I first arrived in Sosua I didn’t know what to expect, but I didn’t expect it to be quiet. This town is really quiet during the day- there’s just nothing going on. It’s a sleepy town. But once you get to the beach it becomes much more lively and you start to feel like you’re in the DR. The main beach here is in my opinion, the number one reason to visit. I stayed in Sosua for 5 days and a lot of that time was at the beach.

Reasons To Visit

There are several reasons why someone would either want to visit or stay for an extended period of time. These reasons are listed below.

Sosua Beach

There are a couple of different beaches in town, but Sosua Beach is the liveliest and most popular. The other beaches are good too, but they are more private and secluded. Sosua Beach stretches for miles, so you will be sure to enjoy the soft sand and incredible ocean views. In addition, there are many local restaurants right on the beach. The service is fantastic and the fish they serve is delicious and local caught.

Snorkeling is one of the top activities here. It makes for some of the best snorkeling in the entire country. You can see so many different, exotic fish and coral reefs. It’s just a very relaxing and enjoyable experience. There are a couple shops at the entrance of Sosua Beach that sell and rent snorkeling equipment. I think I paid about 250 pesos to rent the equipment for the day. There’s also scuba diving available that’s supposed to be good as well.

Sosua Beach

Easy on Your Wallet

Compared to other beach towns in the Dominican Republic, Sosua is relatively inexpensive. There are a lot of housing options available for either short or long-term rent. Most of these places are condos and apartments. Hotels are also pretty cheap. The food isn’t particular cheap, but it’s not particular expensive either.

Transportation can be very cheap depending on how much risk you want to take. If you’re fine with taking moto-taxis everywhere then you’re going to save a lot of money. Some rides will only cost you 40 pesos, which is only about $1 USD. The disadvantage is that these moto-taxis are not very safe. When you get on one you probably won’t be wearing a helmet, so there’s risk with that. And most of these drivers drive like crazy, taking unnecessary chances on the road in order to get you to your destination just a little faster. There are some regular taxis, but they aren’t too common. Usually you’ll have to call one to pick you up. There are usually a few regular taxis at the beach entrance.

Tourist Friendly

When in Sosua, you do realize that you’re in a foreign country but sometimes you forget. This is because tourism makes up over half of the local economy, so over the years the tourists have shaped and altered the culture. This is certainly good if you’re a tourist, as you can get some of the best aspects from home while also getting some of the best aspects of the DR.

For instance, have you ever worried about missing big NFL football games? Here in Sosua you don’t have to worry about that. Many apartment complexes have satellite TV with American channels. Also if you want to go out to watch the game then you can do that too. There are sports bars that specialize in showing American sports.

And as far as food goes, you’ll be able to order any of the popular American classics: pizza, chicken wings, and hamburgers. These specialty cuisines can be tough to order in other parts of the country. You can even get Mexican food at El Toro Negro, which is located right on the beach. This restaurant also offers a shuttle service at night and they will safely take you from the restaurant to the parking lot.

Reasons To Avoid

It’s not all sunshine and rainbows in Sosua. Below I’ll list some negative aspects of this town.

Safety at Night Downtown

I’ve been living in the DR for a while, and I’ve rarely felt unsafe. But Sosua at night, on the main street, did not feel safe to walk around. There was one instance in particular. I was walking down main street late at night and then all of a sudden this man jumps right into my walking path. He starts patting me on my chest for some reason and I quickly push him off and walk away. I’m not sure what his motive was but I easily could have been robbed in that situation. At night there are cops patrolling the area on motorbikes but they can’t see everything.

I have been told from a reliable source, however, that the beach is safe at night.

Nightlife

Aside from safety, the nightlife just isn’t that good. There are a lot hookers walking around trying to get your attention, which quickly gets annoying. And there doesn’t appear to be any bars that have ‘normal’ girls. Your best bet for meeting non-working girls here is to go to the restaurants and talk to the waitresses. These are girls who have decent jobs and aren’t trying to just extract money from you because you’re a foreigner. But you still have to be careful. It would take a while for me to trust any girl from Sosua.

Conclusion

You can certainly make Sosua work for you, but in my opinion you’re better off going to a different beach town such as Cabarete. However Sosua does have its advantages such as its awesome beach, and the cheap cost of living. If you are coming just to visit, then I wouldn’t come for more than a couple days. Go snorkeling or scuba diving, relax on the beach, and then leave.


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